The Naviagation series

navigation series 

The Navigation Series: Kemyel Crease 2013. mixed media on panel.

I am drawn to the ways in which we find our way.

The rhythm of walking generates a kind of rhythm of thinking, and the passage through a landscape echoes or stimulates the passage through a series of thoughts. This creates an odd consonance between internal and external passage, one that suggests that the mind is a landscape of sorts and that walking is a way to traverse it’.

Rebecca Solnit
From ‘Wanderlust- A History of Walking’.

The act of walking is a means to understand our body in relation to the world.

Last year the poet Simon Armitage was moving along the South West coast path, embedded in the landscape, his thoughts and the movement of his body.
I made a body of work looking at what it is to navigate your way through the world, and the different visual means we have to relate the journey.

I went out in a boat from Newlyn, we sailed up a section of the coast and I recorded the features of the landscape, both natural and man-made, that are used by mariners to plot their route and know their place upon it. Kemyel Crease is one of these features. I overlaid a climbing route of dots, another aspect of the walk that Armitage would not see, but that many had traversed.

I made work that featured the stars that were above him on particular dates of his walk- the ancient means to find your way.

My paintings are of another view of Simon Armitage’s progress along his path.

The Uphill Road To Grace

'Going Nowhere Fast' 2013- Found on one of the pilgrimage routes to Santiago, the Camino Francais. Yellow arrows feature on all the routes as a means to find the way.

‘Going Nowhere Fast’ 2013- Found on one of the pilgrimage routes to Santiago, the Camino Francais. Yellow arrows feature on all the routes as a means to find the way.

Walking has become an act of resistance in our culture of speed: the deepening of the relationship between personality, place, pace and peace becomes apparent with any sustained walk. There are rhythms thrashed out between your physical state, the nature of the terrain and the movement of the air around you. You are suddenly more vulnerable and so thoughts alter, priorities are questioned: a sense of something bigger makes itself known. Our place in this place becomes what we are navigating our way through.